Radiocarbon dating the continuing revolution

Rated 3.81/5 based on 774 customer reviews

If the atmosphere's ratio of carbon-14 to carbon-12 has doubled since the flood and we did not know it, radiocarbon ages of things living soon after the flood would appear to be one half-life (or 5,730 years) older than their true ages.If that ratio quadrupled, organic remains would appear 11,460 (2 x 5,730) years older, etc.However, for the last 3,500 years, the increase in the ratio has been extremely slight.

With less carbon-12 to dilute the carbon-14 continually forming from nitrogen in the upper atmosphere, the ratio of carbon-14 to carbon-12 in the atmosphere would increase.

Half of it will decay in about 5,730 years to form nitrogen.

Half of the remainder will decay in another 5,730 years, and so on.

When a living thing dies, its radiocarbon loss (decay) is no longer balanced by intake, so its radiocarbon steadily decreases with a half-life of 5,730 years.

If we knew the amount of carbon-14 in an organism when it died, we could attempt to date the time of death.

Leave a Reply